Speak to us on WhatsApp 

A herniated disc, also known as a slipped disc, is a condition in which the inner gel-like substance of the disc leaks out through a tear in the outer wall. This can cause pain and other symptoms such as numbness or weakness.
A disc bulge is similar to a herniated disc, but with less leakage of the inner gel substance.


Both conditions are often caused by wear and tear on the discs over time, although they can also be caused by an injury. Osteopathy is a type of complementary/alternative medicine that focuses on treating musculoskeletal problems with manipulative techniques.


Research suggests that the Osteopathic approach can help relieve pain and improve function and is another option for treating back pain associated with herniated discs or sciatica (pain radiating down the leg). It involves primarily manual therapy and other treatments such as physical therapy, acupuncture and occasionally IDD therapy.

Disc Bulge

How Can Osteopathy Help a Herniated Disc?

If you're dealing with a herniated disc, you may be wondering if osteopathy can help, the answer is YES! Osteopathy focuses on treating the musculoskeletal system. This includes the bones, joints, muscles, and connective tissue. Osteopathy can be helpful in treating a herniated disc because it can address the underlying cause of the problem.


Often, a herniated disc is the result of an imbalance in the musculoskeletal system and Osteopathy can help to correct this imbalance and relieve the pressure on the disc. Osteopathy can be an effective treatment for managing pain and promoting healing in the affected area.

There are a variety of physiotherapy techniques that can be used to treat disc herniation and disc bulge.
These techniques can help to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and promote healing. One of the most common modalities used to treat disc herniation and disc bulge is osteopathy. Osteopathy can also help to improve range of motion and flexibility in the affected area. This can help to reduce pain and improve function.


If you're suffering from disc herniation or disc bulge, osteopathy can be an effective treatment option. You can expect to have a few sessions of treatment. The number of sessions will depend on the severity of your herniated disc and the underlying cause of the problem.


In most cases, people see a significant improvement after just a few sessions and is an effective way to address the underlying cause of the problem and relieve pain.


Key Takeaway: Osteopathy is a hands-on form of treatment that can be effective in treating a herniated disc by addressing the underlying cause of the problem.

What Is a Disc Bulge?

A disc bulge is a condition that can occur when the discs in your spine become misshapen. The discs act as cushions between the bones in your spine, and when they bulge, they can put pressure on the nerves that run through your spine.
This can cause pain, numbness, and weakness in your arms or legs. Disc herniation is a more serious condition that can occur when the inner layer of a disc ruptures and the gel-like material inside the disc leaks out. This can also put pressure on the nerves in your spine and cause pain, numbness, and weakness.

Osteopathy can help treat both disc bulges and disc herniations by relieving the pressure on the nerves in your spine.
Osteopathic treatment can also help to improve the function of your spine and reduce the pain and inflammation associated with these conditions.

How to Treat a Herniated Disc?

A disc herniation is a medical condition that occurs when the inner, gel-like substance of a spinal disc protrudes through a tear in the disc's outer layer. This can put pressure on the nerves nearby and cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the affected area. Disc herniations are most commonly seen in the lower back, but they can also occur in the neck. Treatment for a herniated disc depends on the severity of the
condition and the symptoms experienced.


In some cases, the herniated disc will heal on its own with time and rest. However, other cases may require osteopathy/physical therapy, epidural injections, or surgery. If you think you may have a herniated disc, it is important to see a doctor or spine specialist for an accurate diagnosis. Once the diagnosis is made, your doctor will develop a treatment plan that is best for you.

Can an osteopath fix a bulging disc?

The best course of treatment for a bulging disc will vary depending on the individual's specific condition.
However, osteopathy and physiotherapy are both effective treatments for disc herniation and sciatica, and may be able to help reduce or eliminate a bulging disc.

What is the best therapy for a bulging disc?

The best therapy for bulging disc will vary depending on the individual's specific condition and symptoms. However, some common therapies that may be recommended for bulging disc include osteopathy, physiotherapy, and massage therapy.

IDD therapy for disc bulge

As a clinic we also pride ourselves on using the latest in orthopaedic and medical research for rehabilitation and techniques, such as our new IDD machine (Intervertebral Differential Dynamics machine), which is a successful and trusted cost effective, non-surgical spinal decompression treatment for back pain, neck pain and related problems caused by disc bulges. This works by gently tractioning the disc, which helps create space and helps re-hydrate the disc relieving symptoms and speeding up the repair process.

Conclusion

If you are suffering from a herniated disc, sciatica, or disc bulge Osteopathic treatment can provide relief from pain and improve function. If you are suffering from a disc issue, please call our office to schedule an appointment.


The Art Of Healing we pride ourselves on our bespoke approach to treating disc bulges, which uses a mixture of osteopathy, manual therapy, dry needling to reduce muscle tension allow space for the disc.
As a clinic we have helped hundreds of patients suffering with disc bulges and offer guaranteed same day hands on treatment with our expert team to give you relief from your symptoms and develop plans for future progression.


If you think you are suffering from a disc bulge and are looking for expert advice and treatment, we may be able to help. Book an appointment here, contact our team at info@theartofhealing.uk or Call us on 0203 146 6755

Frozen shoulder is a condition that causes pain and stiffness in the shoulder. It can make it hard to do everyday activities, such as reach up or brush your hair. The condition is also called adhesive capsulitis.

Frozen shoulder occurs when the connective tissue around the shoulder joint becomes stiff and inflamed. This makes it difficult for the tendons and muscles in the area to move freely. The exact cause of frozen shoulder is unknown, but it may be related to an injury or overuse of the arm.


The symptoms of frozen shoulder include pain and stiffness in the affected arm, difficulty moving the arm, and decreased range of motion. These symptoms can come on gradually or suddenly. They typically worsen over time before improving eventually improve on their own after about 12-18 months.

There are several treatment options available for frozen shoulder including physical therapy exercises, corticosteroid injections, surgery . Your doctor will likely recommend conservative treatments first such as icing, resting ,and taking anti-inflammatory medications

Frozen Shoulder

Table of Contents

What is frozen shoulder?

Frozen shoulder is a condition where the shoulder joint becomes stiff and painful. It can make it difficult to move the shoulder and may even make it difficult to sleep on the affected side.


Frozen shoulder is also known as adhesive capsulitis. The shoulder is a ball and socket joint. The ball is the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) and the socket is the glenoid cavity of the scapula (shoulder blade). The joint is held together by a tough, rubbery sleeve called the capsule. The capsule is lined with a thin layer of tissue called the synovium. The synovium produces a small amount of fluid that lubricates the joint.


The shoulder joint is held in place by a group of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach the humerus to the scapula. These muscles and tendons help lift the arm. The biceps muscle attaches the shoulder to the elbow. The triceps muscle attaches the shoulder to the elbow on the other side. Frozen shoulder occurs when the capsule and synovium become thickened and inflamed. This can happen for a variety of reasons, but the exact cause is unknown in
most cases.


Frozen shoulder is more common in women than men and usually occurs between the ages of 40 and 60.
There are three stages of frozen shoulder:
Stage 1: The shoulder is stiff and painful. This stage can last for several weeks to several months.
Stage 2: The shoulder joint begins to loosen up. This stage can last for several months.
Stage 3: The shoulder joint becomes normal again. This stage can last for several months to a year.


Most people with frozen shoulder will eventually get better without treatment. However, the condition can be painful and debilitating. There are several treatment options available to help speed up the recovery process.
Osteopaths can teach you exercises that stretch and strengthen the muscles and ligaments around the shoulder joint. These exercises can help improve range of motion and reduce pain. If physical therapy does not help, your doctor may recommend a corticosteroid injection. This injection is given into the shoulder joint. It can help reduce inflammation and pain. If the pain is severe, your doctor may
recommend surgery.


Surgery is usually only done as a last resort. The goal of surgery is to release the thickened and inflamed capsule around the shoulder joint.
Frozen shoulder is a condition that can be painful and debilitating. However, most people will eventually get better without treatment.
There are several treatment options available to help speed up the recovery process. If you are experiencing pain and stiffness in your shoulder, talk to your doctor.
Key Takeaway: Frozen shoulder is a condition where the shoulder joint becomes stiff and painful. It is more common in women than men and usually occurs between the ages of 40 and 60. Most people with frozen shoulder will eventually get better without treatment.

The Causes of Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder typically comes on gradually and worsens over time. The shoulder may become so stiff that it is difficult to move it. There are a number of possible causes of frozen shoulder.
The most common is age-related wear and tear of the shoulder joint. Other possible causes include injury to the shoulder, surgery on the shoulder, or certain medical conditions such as diabetes.
Treatment for frozen shoulder typically involves a combination of physical therapy and medication. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to release the shoulder joint.

The Symptoms of Frozen Shoulder

The condition is also known as adhesive capsulitis. Frozen shoulder typically affects people between the ages of 40 and 60. The condition is more common in women than men.
Frozen shoulder typically develops slowly. The first symptoms may be mild pain and stiffness in the shoulder.
The pain may worsen over time and the shoulder may become increasingly stiff. The condition may last for several months or longer. Frozen shoulder is a condition that is treated with a combination of physical
therapy, pain medication, and corticosteroid injections. Surgery is rarely needed. The condition is also more common in people with diabetes, thyroid problems, or a history of shoulder injury or surgery.

How Is Frozen Shoulder Diagnosed?

Frozen shoulder is typically diagnosed through a combination of a physical examination and imaging tests, such as X-rays or MRI.

There are three stages of frozen shoulder:

Stage 1: Freezing stage. This stage is characterized by pain and stiffness in the shoulder that gradually worsens.
Stage 2: Frozen stage. This stage is characterized by a decrease in shoulder pain, but the stiffness and loss of motion in the shoulder joint continue to worsen.
Stage 3: Thawing stage. This stage is characterized by a gradual improvement in shoulder range of motion and a decrease in stiffness.

Frozen shoulder is typically diagnosed through a combination of a physical examination and imaging tests, such as X-rays or MRI. Treatment for frozen shoulder typically involves a combination of manual/physical therapy, exercises, and in some cases steroid injections.
In some cases, surgery may be necessary to release the frozen shoulder.

Key Takeaway: Frozen shoulder is a condition characterized by stiffness and pain in the shoulder. It most often affects people between the ages of 40 and 60 and is more common in women than men. The exact cause of frozen shoulder is unknown, but it is believed to be related to an injury or inflammation
of the shoulder capsule. This condition can be managed with manual/physical therapy.

FAQs in Relation to Frozen Shoulder

What is the fastest way to get rid of a frozen shoulder?

The fastest way to get rid of a frozen shoulder is through treatment.

How do you fix a frozen shoulder?

There is no one definitive answer to this question as the best way to fix a frozen shoulder depends on the underlying cause of the condition. However, some common treatments for frozen shoulder include physical therapy, steroid injections, and surgery. Osteopathy/Manual therapy has been demonstrated in
the media to be an effective way of improving shoulder mobility and reducing pain in patients with frozen shoulder.

Can frozen shoulder go away on its own?

There is no definite answer to this question as frozen shoulder can vary greatly from person to person.
Some people may find that their frozen shoulder improves over time without any treatment, while others may require more aggressive interventions such as physical therapy or surgery. In any cases the symptoms of pain and discomfort can be managed through treatment using physical and manual therapy, which have the best medium- and long-term outcomes.

How long does frozen shoulder last?

Frozen shoulder typically lasts between six and nine months. However, some people may experience symptoms for up to two years.

Conclusion

If you think you may have frozen shoulder, it is important to see your doctor for an accurate diagnosis. There are several treatment options available that can help improve symptoms and range of motion. With proper treatment, most people with frozen shoulder will eventually make a full recovery.

At The Art Of Healing we pride ourselves on our bespoke approach to treating frozen shoulder, which uses a mixture of osteopathy, manual therapy, dry needling and the latest in orthopaedic and medical research for rehabilitation and techniques has helped hundreds of patients at our clinic suffering with
Frozen shoulder. We offer guaranteed same day hands on treatment with our expert team to give you relief from your symptoms and develop plans for future progression.


If you think you are suffering from Frozen Shoulder and are looking for expert advice and treatment, we may be able to help. Book an appointment here, contact our team at info@theartofhealing.uk or Call us on 0203 146 6755.

If you're struggling with plantar fasciitis pain, then you know how debilitating it can be. It's a sharp, stabbing pain that seems to come out of nowhere and just won't go away.

You've tried all the usual treatments – rest, ice, stretching – but nothing seems to help. Plantar fasciitis is a common condition that affects millions of people every year.

The good news is that there are treatment options available that can provide relief from the pain and help you get back to your normal activities.

Plantar Fasciitis

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

If you've ever experienced pain in your feet, you may be familiar with the term "Plantar Fasciitis. " Plantar fasciitis is a condition that results in pain in the heel and bottom of the foot.

The pain is often worst when you take your first steps in the morning or after sitting for a long period of time. Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, becomes inflamed.

The plantar fascia is a tough and flexible band of tissue that helps support the arch of your foot. When this tissue becomes inflamed, it can cause heel pain.

There are a number of things that can lead to plantar fasciitis, including:

Obesity

Pregnancy

Repetitive stress on the foot, such as from running or dancing.

Poor shoes

If you're experiencing heel pain, it's important to see a doctor to rule out other potential causes of the pain, such as a stress fracture.

Once other causes have been ruled out, there are a number of treatments that can help relieve the pain of plantar fasciitis, including:

Rest

Ice

Stretch

Physical therapy

Orthotics

Surgery

If you're dealing with plantar fasciitis, don't despair. There are treatments that can help you find relief from the pain.

Key Takeaway: Plantar fasciitis is a condition that results in pain in the heel and bottom of the foot. The pain is often worst when you take your first steps in the morning or after sitting for a long period of time.

Causes of Plantar Fasciitis

This condition is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia, a band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot from your heel to your toes.

Plantar fasciitis is a common condition that affects people of all ages, but is most common in adults aged 40-60. There are several factors that can contribute to the development of plantar fasciitis, including:

Obesity

Pregnancy

Diabetes

Flat feet or high arches

Tight calf muscles

Wearing shoes with poor support

If you are suffering from plantar fasciitis, there are several things you can do to find relief. Resting and icing the affected foot can help to reduce the pain and inflammation.

You can also try stretching exercises or wearing a night splint to keep the plantar fascia stretched while you sleep. If these conservative treatments don't provide relief, we may be able to help.

Key Takeaway: Plantar fasciitis is a common condition that causes sharp pain in the heel or arch. Rest, ice, stretching, and night splints can help.

Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a condition that can cause a lot of pain and discomfort.

The good news is that there are treatments available that can help.

Symptoms of plantar fasciitis can include:

Pain in the heel or foot, especially when standing up after sitting for a while.

Pain that is worse in the morning or after activities.

Swelling or tenderness in the heel or foot.

Stiffness in the foot

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it's important to see a doctor. They can diagnose plantar fasciitis and develop a treatment plan that is right for you.

Treatment options can include:

Rest

Ice

Stretching exercises

Physical therapy

Custom orthotics

Surgery (in rare cases)

With the right treatment, you can find relief from the pain of plantar fasciitis and get back to your life.

Key Takeaway: Plantar fasciitis is a condition that can cause sharp pain in the heel or foot. There are treatments available that can help.

Treatment Options for Plantar Fasciitis

If you're reading this, then you probably already know that plantar fasciitis is no picnic. The heel pain associated with this condition can make everyday activities feel like torture.

Here at the Art Of Healing we have extensive training to deal with these problems through releasing of tension within these muscles and provide, manipulation and mobilisation techniques to help to restore biomechanical support to the foot. Our team can then provide targeted exercises to strengthen and decompress these tissues leading to better pain and function outcomes.

The word Fasciitis means fascia inflammation Fasci-itis. However, current literature suggests that plantar fasciitis is more correctly termed fasciosis because of the chronicity of the disease and the evidence of degeneration rather than inflammation.

At the Art Of Healing we have access to a Shockwave machine, which research suggests can help relive chronic symptoms of Plantar Fascitiis by breaking down the degenerative tissues and thus helping to promote synthesis of new and healthy Plantar fascia tissue.

Prevention of Plantar Fascitiis

The good news is that there are things you can do to prevent the condition from worsening or even happening in the first place.

Here are some tips:

Wear Supportive Shoes.
This is especially important if you are on your feet a lot or if you have flat feet. Wearing shoes with good arch support can help to prevent the development of plantar fasciitis.

Stretch Your Calves and Feet.
This helps to prevent the plantar fascia from becoming too tight.

Use a Night Splint.
This helps to stretch the plantar fascia overnight and can prevent the pain from getting worse.

Massage Your Feet.
This can help to loosen the plantar fascia and relieve the pain.

Don't Overdo It.
If you are active, make sure to warm up before and cool down after. And don’t forget to rest your feet when you can.


Key Takeaway: Wearing supportive shoes, stretching, and massaging your feet can help prevent or relieve plantar fasciitis pain.

Conclusion

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a condition that results in pain in the heel and bottom of the foot. It is caused by inflammation of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that runs across the bottom of the foot from the heel to the toes.

The plantar fascia helps to support your arch and absorb shock when you walk or run. When it becomes inflamed, it can cause severe pain in your heel or arch area.

If you're dealing with any kind of pain in your tendons, bursae, or plantar fascia, shockwave therapy could be the answer you've been looking for. This cutting-edge treatment is a safe and effective way to reduce inflammation and promote healing. At Shockwave Therapt, we offer personalized care to each and every one of our patients. We'll work with you to create a treatment plan that fits your unique needs. Contact us today to learn more about how.

We offer guaranteed same day hands on treatment with our expert team to give you relief from your symptoms and develop plans for future progression.


If you think you are suffering from Plantar Fasciitis and are looking for expert advice and treatment, we may be able to help. Book an appointment here, contact our team at info@theartofhealing.uk or Call us on 0203 146 6755.

Do you have hip pain that you feel in the groin or the side of your hip?

Do you find it difficult to walk without limping, sitting for a while or squatting?

Have you been diagnosed with Femoroacetabular Impingement and looking for an expert help and advice?

What is FAI?

IT is a condition in which extra bone grows along one or both of the bones that form the hip joint – the femur or the acetabulum – causing them not to fit together perfectly. They therefore rub against each other during movement, over time this friction can damage the joint, leading to pain.

FAI is caused by bones not forming normally during childhood. Athletic people may tend to experience symptoms sooner than those who are less active, but exercise does not cause FAI.

FAI hip-inflammation

What can be done about FAI?

To help alleviate symptoms, key elements are articulation and muscle rehab. Articulation is a type of manual therapy treatment that involves moving a joint in certain directions to ensure its range of motion is optimal. Rehab exercises are used to engage muscles to help take pressure off the joint, as well as correct any weaknesses around the hip and pelvis that may hinder healing.

Additionally, treating any asymmetries, restrictions and weaknesses above and below the problematic area (such as the lower spine or the knees) can help you improve your symptoms too.

How can we help with FAI?

Practitioners at our clinic can answer any questions you may have, and assess you to confirm or deny that it is FAI causing your symptoms. If your condition is safe to treat we will give you comprehensive treatment, this may include the affected area and nearby structures. We will also recommend rehab exercises tailored to your condition and your lifestyle.
Feel free to contact us with any questions!

We offer guaranteed same day hands on treatment with our expert team to give you relief from your symptoms and develop plans for future progression.


If you think you are suffering from Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and are looking for expert advice and treatment, we may be able to help. Book an appointment here, contact our team at info@theartofhealing.uk or Call us on 0203 146 6755.

 
CLINICAL DIRECTOR
 

Peter is the Clinical director and founder of the Art of Healing. His approach to treatment is to provide Total Healthcare and offer an extensive and holistic approach for his clients and patients. To this end Peter has completed training in Western Medical acupuncture, Traditional Chinese Medical and Japanese acupuncure, myofascial release techniques and functional movement as well as completing apprenticeships in Japanese Seitai bodywork and the Evolve movement method.
 
Peter works extensively with professional athletes including members of the Premier League, Olympic squad members and professional combat athletes.

MASSAGE THERAPIST

Florence Hall is a specialist massage therapist qualified in deep tissue, therapeutic massage and pregnancy massage. She uses a combination of deep tissue massage, active release and assisted stretching in her treatments and offers a highly qualified approach to musculoskeletal and mental wellness.

Florence offers a safe, non-judgemental environment and delights in working with people from all walks of life, with all kinds of bodies, to relax, tune in and let go of their pain.

Website by Blue Web
chevron-downmenu-circlecross-circle